The Moment You’ve Waited For

L A D I E S   A N D   G E N T L E M E N . . .

The story of P T Barnum has been told before, notably in Cy Coleman’s eponymous musical Barnum, but here it gets the big screen treatment and a stunning new score from Hollywood and Broadway’s hottest duo, Benj Pasek and Justin Paul. (This seems a good moment to note that I am reviewing this film as a film alone, and not on historical accuracy or the statements it makes about the man behind the name).

I am pretty split on movie musicals: when they are done right they can be absolutely magical: Chicago, for instance. When they are done wrong, however… it can be a major disappointment to say the least.

The Greatest Showman was not one of these disappointments. From Hugh Jackman’s enthralling opening lines, through the vibrant costumes to the big set numbers, this was a totally self-assured, intoxicating musical. The immersive nature of the cinematography only added to this exhilaration, bringing the audience along on the evolving journey of P T Barnum’s Circus.

And all that was real is left behind

Don’t fight it, it’s coming for you, running at you

I’m a sucker for anything based around syncopation; it never fails to get my heart pounding and it took all my self control to stay seated once numbers such as ‘From Now On’ took off. Pasek and Paul’s score is, unsurprisingly, the highlight of the film for me and it is so exciting to have songs that aid rather than simply sit alongside the plot. From ‘This Is Me’ to ‘Rewrite the Stars’, defining moments for each character are observed and joyfully communicated to the audience in often touching, always catchy melodies.  

I found the opening particularly moving – after the spectacle and heart pounding build up of ‘The Greatest Show’ the image of the circus being stripped to a boy staring at his seemingly unachievable dreams was a powerful tribute to the power of both imagination and hard work. The two love stories were both believable and eloquently poignant; the enduring love between Charity and Phineas Barnum alongside the boundary-defying, risk-it-all devotion of Anne and Phillip, heart-renderingly captured in the hospital bedside scene.

The casting is (in my opinion) flawless. Having had issues with Hugh Jackman in Les Miserables my expectations were not particularly high, but here his warmth and zest shone through in the character of Barnum. Zac Efron appeared right at home and Zendaya was a revelation, transcending the triple threat to include stunning trapeze artistry into her repetoire. Her chemistry with Efron was consistently believable and the mixture of pain, love and fear felt by her character utterly consuming. Each actor perfectly complimented the whole company, the inclusive message truly compounded by a cast seemingly delighting in each other’s presence.

You’re dreaming with your eyes wide open

So, come alive!

🌟 Personal Highlight 🌟

EVERYTHING about Keala Settle! I loved seeing a true Broadway gem in a big budget movie musical (star casting is often one of my biggest problems with the genre) and both her talent and exuberant joy shone through in her portrayal of Lettie Lutz, a character who’s journey truly epitomised the message of the film.

Reading this back I seem pretty ready with my praise, but The Greatest Showman truly captured my heart and my imagination. Many critics complained the musical was ‘old-fashioned’ but to me all that means is a wonderful mix of dance, music and acting wrapped up in a moving, uplifiting and thoughtful plot: what could be better?

Uplifting, stunning, eye opening. This is The Greatest Show.

For a significantly more eloquent take on the film, see my favourite review over at Roger Ebert here.

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